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Ready To Fly Drones for 2019 Aerial Photos

Ready To Fly Drones for 2019 Aerial Photos

Most of us in the hobby are looking for a drone that is large enough to support a decently long flight time, hold a camera or other data capture device, and be able to control some (or all) of its flight autonomously using pre-programmed coordinates or real-time data. We want to race around or solo the skies and there are a few things to consider before making your purchase. Because of concerns for possible bodily injury and property damage, anyone who operates a drone needs insurance coverage. However, most commercial and personal insurance carriers exclude drones and other unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) or unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) from their policies, making coverage hard to find. Most standard homeowners insurance policies exclude liability coverage for aircraft, but will include coverage for “model or hobby aircraft,” like your personal drone. Commercial or business use of your drone is not normally covered under a homeowners policy. Most insurance company policy wordings would cover a drone in the same way that they would cover your personal property or contents. Depending on your specific insurer, you may not have to pay any additional amount to make sure your drone is covered! See “What You Need to Know About Drones and Your Insurance“, by MILA ARAUJO for a very good article on the subject.   The following drones are very good picks to select from this year to get a solid model that’s stable in flight with an excellent integrated camera. These drones are focused on aircraft intended for aerial imaging and videography.   DJI Mavic 2 Pro DJI Inspire 2 DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2 Autel Robotics EVO Parrot Anafi DJI Mavic Air DJI Spark Yuneec...
Drone Open Source Building

Drone Open Source Building

You can click on the following FPV Drone Parts image and zoom in for further details:   HOW TO BUILD A DRONE | STEP BY STEP GUIDE LINK   After taking a look at the Step By Step Guide above by clicking on the link, take a look at the following content links regarding the brains of your drone as it relates to the Flight Controller. ArduPilot is a open source autopilot system supporting multi-copters, traditional helicopters, fixed wing aircraft and rovers. The source code is developed by a large community of professionals and enthusiasts. New developers are always welcome! The best way to start is by joining the Developer Team Forum, which is open to all and chock-full of daily development goodness The Dronecode Project hosted under the Linux Foundation serves as the vendor-neutral home for PX4, MAVLink, QGroundControl, and the Dronecode SDK. The Dronecode Project delivers a collaborative and shared open source Platform for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs).  A neutral place where industry and community developers can contribute technology in order to reduce costs and time to market. Dronecode aims to create a sustainable ecosystem and community for open source projects, everything needed for a complete UAV solution: flight-controller hardware, autopilot software, ground control station, and developer APIs for enhanced/advanced use cases. DronePan makes it easy to capture aerial panoramas with a click of a button with your DJI Phantom 3, Phantom 4, Inspire 1, Inspire 2 or Mavic Pro drone. Right now DronePan runs on iOS devices and an Android version is currently in beta. Flone is a platform that allows smartphones to fly, and not...
Let’s not ground drones because of a few ‘close calls’

Let’s not ground drones because of a few ‘close calls’

A recent article describing a brewing controversy over Drone Flights published yesterday in The Hill.  AMA members are urged to stay informed and fly responsibly : Last week, the Air Line Pilots Association, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, and Airlines for America issued a letter to Congress calling for tighter regulation on drones. Responding to a video captured by a drone illegally flying within feet of a jet landing at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas, the letter calls on Congress to get aggressive with hobby and recreational drone use. “The likelihood that a drone will collide with an airline aircraft,” the letter concludes, “is increasing.” The letter — echoing many of the news headlines surrounding the video — makes a common error: Observing one collision and a handful of “close calls” does not mean the probability of or the dangers presented by drone collisions have changed. Indeed, the best estimates show that the risk is extremely low, and the one confirmed collision that caused no injuries is consistent with an acceptable risk level. This may sound like technical nitpicking, but it has significant implications for the future of drone regulation. The signers of the letter call for the implementation of an onerous drone registry and mandates for all drones to be equipped with tracking technology, but they fail to demonstrate that drones pose a significant risk that requires new regulations, rather than better enforcement of some current ones. Understanding the need for regulation requires some knowledge of the risk drones pose. A 2016 analysis by our former Mercatus colleagues Eli Dourado and Sam Hammond approximated that risk by looking at incidents of birds striking airplanes in...
Air traffic control for drones is coming!

Air traffic control for drones is coming!

You don’t need permission from the FAA to fly your UAS (aka drone) for fun or recreation, but you must always fly safely. More than ever our AMA  club flying fields and where can I fly be key to our sUAS recreational use. What are the safety guidelines for sUAS recreational users? Follow community-based safety guidelines, as developed by organizations such as the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA). Fly no higher than 400 feet and remain below any surrounding obstacles when possible. Keep your sUAS in eyesight at all times, and use an observer to assist if needed. Remain well clear of and do not interfere with manned aircraft operations, and you must see and avoid other aircraft and obstacles at all times. Do not intentionally fly over unprotected persons or moving vehicles, and remain at least 25 feet away from individuals and vulnerable property. Contact the airport and control tower before flying within five miles of an airport or heliport. (Read about best practices here) Do not fly in adverse weather conditions such as in high winds or reduced visibility. Do not fly under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Ensure the operating environment is safe and that the operator is competent and proficient in the operation of the sUAS. Do not fly near or over sensitive infrastructure or property such as power stations, water treatment facilities, correctional facilities, heavily traveled roadways, government facilities, etc. Check and follow all local laws and ordinances before flying over private property. Do not conduct surveillance or photograph persons in areas where there is an expectation of privacy without the individual’s permission (see AMA’s privacy policy). The following link is a must read because...
Drone rule takes effect Monday, awaited by thousands

Drone rule takes effect Monday, awaited by thousands

Source: Bart Jansen, USA TODAY WASHINGTON – The first comprehensive federal rule governing drones takes effect Monday, when government and industry officials say thousands of pilots of remote-controlled aircraft are eager to start their engines. Earl Lawrence, director of the Federal Aviation Administration’s drone office, said 3,351 people signed up to take a test of aviation knowledge Monday —the first day possible — to certify themselves as drone pilots. Another hint of the pent-up demand is that 20,000 commercial drone operators have already registered to start flying, in anticipation of passing those tests that become available Monday, he said. “That’s a good indication we’re going to have a lot of people and a lot of aircraft operating from day one,” Lawrence told a group of dozens of congressional staffers Wednesday. The rule governing drones weighing up to 55 pounds will largely replace the special permission that FAA granted in recent years to 5,542 applications for commercial uses of drones, such as for aerial photography, utility inspection or crop observation. Special waivers could still be granted. But the rule basically allows pilots who pass the test to fly whenever they want up to 400 feet in the air during daylight hours while keeping the aircraft within sight of the pilot and away from other aircraft. Hobbyists have always been allowed to fly under similar guidelines, but commercial pilots have had to file cumbersome applications for special permission — until now. “Monday is a big day,” Lawrence said. “We’re expecting it to blossom tremendously.” The rule released in June was a long time coming. Congress ordered FAA in 2012 legislation to...
FAA PUNTS ON THE PREEMPTION ISSUE IN PART 107

FAA PUNTS ON THE PREEMPTION ISSUE IN PART 107

Source: Drone Laws Blog  Photo Credit: FAA The FAA’s recent announcement of Part 107, the final rule for commercial small unmanned aircraft systems (SUAS or drones), has justifiably received a lot of publicity and general praise.  There has been little comment on what the rule does, or rather does not do, on the issue of federal preemption of state and local drone regulations. Federal preemption is what’s referred to in political circles as a “third rail” issue. Like the electrified third rail on a subway system, you don’t touch it unless you absolutely have to, and it can shock and hurt whatever or whoever touches it.  For that reason, it was not surprising that the FAA’s 2015 SUAS NPRM did not mention preemption.  Nonetheless, during the rulemaking proceeding the FAA received a number of comments on federal preemption. Most contended that without a preemption provision, state and local governments would continue to attempt to regulate small UAS operations, resulting in potentially conflicting rules and hampering the industry’s development. They argued that conflicting rules lead to confusion and litigation costs, burden commercial and hobbyist UAS users, and delay the adoption of UAS technology. Under the federal Administrative Procedure Act, the FAA had a duty to review the preemption comments and make at least some response showing that it had considered the arguments made by commenters.  Continue reading the preemption issue in Part 107…  ...