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AC 107-2 – Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS)

AC 107-2 – Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS)

Photo Credit: FAA         Source: FAA The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is amending its regulations to adopt specific rules for the operation of small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) through a final rule. These changes address the classification of sUAS, certification of sUAS remote pilots, and sUAS operational limitations. This advisory circular (AC) provides guidance for conducting sUAS operations in the NAS in accordance with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 107. Summary as of May 2016, see above link for current details signed June AC 107-2 (PDF, 404 KB): Category Proposed Provisions Aircraft Requirements The sUAS must be registered with the FAA prior to flight. Aircraft markings are required. FAA airworthiness certification not required. However, the Remote Pilot in Command (Remote PIC) must maintain small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) in a condition for safe operation and prior to flight must inspect the UAS to ensure that it is in a condition for safe operation. 14 CFR part 107 does not apply to model aircraft that satisfy all of the criteria specified in Public Law 112–95 section 336. 14 CFR part 107 codifies the FAA’s enforcement authority in part 101 by prohibiting model aircraft operators from endangering the safety of the National Airspace System (NAS). Remote Pilot in Command (Remote PIC) Certification and Responsibilities Remote PICs are required to: • Be at least 16 years old • Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language (FAA may make exceptions for medical reasons) • Be in a physical and mental condition that would not...
FAA Announces Final Small UAS Rule

FAA Announces Final Small UAS Rule

Photo Credit: FAA These Special Rules for Model Aircraft helps to maintain our exemptions for model aircraft. For more on the FAA’s final small UAS rule, we encourage you to read this USA Today story, “FAA completes landmark rules for commercial drones,” which includes a mention of AMA’s analysis of UAS sightings released earlier this month....
WE ARE RAPIDLY APPROACHING A TIME WHERE DRONE DELIVERY IS A REALITY

WE ARE RAPIDLY APPROACHING A TIME WHERE DRONE DELIVERY IS A REALITY

THE FIRST URBAN DRONE DELIVERY JUST HAPPENED IN NEVADA - MARCH 10 Source: By Kelsey D. Atherton - Popular Science Hawthorne, Nevada isn’t known for much. The town of roughly 3,000 sits on the western edge of the state, near an Army ammunition depot, and not much else. Announced today, Hawthorne is now the site of what might be a historic precedent: the first urban delivery in the United States by a fully autonomous drone. The drone was flown by drone delivery company Flirtey, which got it’s start in 2013 in Australia, delivering textbooks to universities, before it moved to Nevada. Its six-engine multicopter flew along a predetermined path. When it reached the target house, it lowered a package containing bottled water, emergency food, and a first aid kit. The house was uninhabited, as the flight was a demonstration of what a rescue drone might be able to carry to people in need. Flirtey already conducted a rural delivery test, so it makes sense that urban was next, even if that “urban” is defined as a fairly small town. According to Flirtey CEO Matthew Sweeney, 86% of packages are 5.5 pounds or less, and that the drone is designed to carry payloads that size up to 10 miles away. “Hawthorne is a town with ideal characteristics for us, because you’ve got residential housing lots that have trees, power lines, that are perfect for research and testing precision delivery,” Sweeney told Popular Science, “the kinds of things you have in a regular suburban environment.” After Hawthorne, Sweeney said, the next step is to “do it over an urban populated area, the kind...
GoPro Hero 5: Everything You Need To Know

GoPro Hero 5: Everything You Need To Know

GoPro will ultimately deliver a completely autonomous drone, requiring absolutely no piloting? Source: Christopher Morris, at ValueWalk. The release of the GoPro Hero 5 will be an extremely important one for the action camera manufacturer, following the desperate slide of its share price. It is essential for the company to impress consumers with this next generation action camera, and it is also widely anticipated that numerous new features will be included. Smaller and lighter The first thing to note about the GoPro Hero 5 is that it will be significantly smaller and lighter than the previous releases in the series. That have been release delays with this camera thus far, and it is believed that this is related to manufacturing challenges in producing the sleekest and most mobile camera possible. GoPro Hero 5 with drone compatibility It has also been suggested that GoPro will ensure that drone compatibility is part of the makeup of the GoPro Hero 5, which would fit in with the other plans of the company. GoPro has reportedly been working on autonomous drones over the last few months, with the company wishing to make a serious investment in this potentially vast marketplace. GoPro will ultimately deliver a completely autonomous drone, requiring absolutely no piloting. Waterproofing Rumors have also indicated that the GoPro Hero 5 will feature outstanding underwater shooting capabilities, as the manufacturers look to widen the scope of this action camera. It is believed that the GoPro Hero 5 will deliver underwater shooting at a depth of 60 meters, which would be a 300 percent improvement over the existing GoPro Hero 4. This would hopefully...
Drones 101: An illustrated introduction to flying data collectors

Drones 101: An illustrated introduction to flying data collectors

Source: Chemical and Engineering News, By Sarah Everts and Matt Davenport For all the unique challenges and advantages flying robots bring, the story of drones borrows from several familiar tales. It’s a story about companies shrinking the size and price tag of electronics. It’s about scientists and engineers developing lighter and more compact sensors. It’s about military technology gliding peacefully into civilian life. For a primer on the various types of drones being harnessed for scientific research, C&EN turned to two experts: Michael G. Wing of Oregon State University, who’s building a catalog of small research drones, and Greg Crutsinger, who works for the drone developer 3D Robotics helping schools and students adopt these flying tools....