(800) 435-9262
Redesigned B4UFLY App Available Now

Redesigned B4UFLY App Available Now

Today, the FAA in partnership with Kittyhawk relaunched its B4UFLY mobile application that allows recreational drone flyers know where they can and cannot fly in the national airspace system (NAS). The new B4UFLY app is now available to download for free at the App Store for iOS and Google Play store for...
FAA Highlights Changes for Recreational Drones

FAA Highlights Changes for Recreational Drones

For: GovDelivery Communications Cloud on behalf of: U.S. Federal Aviation Administration The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is implementing changes for recreational drone flyers man.dated by Congress in the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018. While recreational flyers may continue to fly below 400 feet in uncontrolled airspace without specific certification or operating authority from the FAA, they are now required to obtain prior authorization from the FAA before flying in controlled airspace around airports. Furthermore, they must comply with all airspace restrictions and prohibitions when flying in controlled and uncontrolled airspace. The new requirement to obtain an airspace authorization prior to flying a drone in controlled airspace replaces the old requirement to notify the airport operator and the airport air traffic control tower prior to flying within five miles of an airport. Until further notice, air traffic control facilities will no longer accept requests to operate recreational drones in controlled airspace on a case-by-case basis. Instead, to enable operations under the congressionally-mandated exception for limited recreational drone operations, the FAA is granting temporary airspace authorizations to fly in certain “fixed sites” in controlled airspace throughout the country. The fixed sites are listed online and will be routinely updated. The sites are also shown as blue dots on Unmanned Aircraft Systems Facility Maps. The maps depict the maximum altitude above ground level at which a drone may be flown safely for each location in controlled airspace. In the future, recreational flyers will be able to obtain authorization from the FAA to fly in controlled airspace. The FAA currently has a system called the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC), which...
FAA seeks comments on Safe & Secure Operations of UAS

FAA seeks comments on Safe & Secure Operations of UAS

Source: AMA GOVERNMENT RELATIONS BLOG Model aviation needs your help to ensure future regulations do not place unnecessary burdens on our community.  Last month, the FAA issued an advanced notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) regarding the safe and secure operations of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). In this ANPRM, the FAA is currently seeking comments on potential new rulemaking for operational and performance restrictions on UAS, including model aircraft. Some of the parameters being considered include altitude, airspeed, stand-off distances and unmanned aircraft traffic management.AMA has long held that the hobby of model aviation has introduced no new risk into the airspace, and therefore should not be subject to any new regulations. AMA is in the process of submitting comments to the FAA to this effect, urging the agency to take into consideration the existing safety guidelines for modelers and the differences between model aircraft and commercial drones – the FAA cannot and should not take a one-size-fits-all approach to regulating them. It is critical that we voice our support for the hobby by submitting a comment to the Federal Register regarding this ANPRM. Click here to submit a comment or visit www.regulations.gov and search for Docket No. FAA – 2018 – 1086; Notice No. 18-08. Below you’ll find a suggested template for comments, which you can customize with your personal story and then copy and paste into the comment field on the Federal Register website. The current deadline for submitting comments is 11:59 pm on April 15, 2019. Rulemaking is a lengthy process but rest assured that AMA will continue to advocate for our members and keep you informed as it progresses.  You can read FAQs...
Ready To Fly Drones for 2019 Aerial Photos

Ready To Fly Drones for 2019 Aerial Photos

Most of us in the hobby are looking for a drone that is large enough to support a decently long flight time, hold a camera or other data capture device, and be able to control some (or all) of its flight autonomously using pre-programmed coordinates or real-time data. We want to race around or solo the skies and there are a few things to consider before making your purchase. Because of concerns for possible bodily injury and property damage, anyone who operates a drone needs insurance coverage. However, most commercial and personal insurance carriers exclude drones and other unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) or unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) from their policies, making coverage hard to find. Most standard homeowners insurance policies exclude liability coverage for aircraft, but will include coverage for “model or hobby aircraft,” like your personal drone. Commercial or business use of your drone is not normally covered under a homeowners policy. Most insurance company policy wordings would cover a drone in the same way that they would cover your personal property or contents. Depending on your specific insurer, you may not have to pay any additional amount to make sure your drone is covered! See “What You Need to Know About Drones and Your Insurance“, by MILA ARAUJO for a very good article on the subject.   The following drones are very good picks to select from this year to get a solid model that’s stable in flight with an excellent integrated camera. These drones are focused on aircraft intended for aerial imaging and videography.   DJI Mavic 2 Pro DJI Inspire 2 DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2 Autel Robotics EVO Parrot Anafi DJI Mavic Air DJI Spark Yuneec...